We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Less is More in Ribosome Assembly
News

Less is More in Ribosome Assembly

Less is More in Ribosome Assembly
News

Less is More in Ribosome Assembly

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Less is More in Ribosome Assembly"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Ribosomes are the cellular machines that make proteins, the molecules that carry out the majority of life’s functions. To make ribosomes, cells need to make an abundance of amino acids (the raw material of proteins) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP, the energy currency required to run the ribosome). However, the assembly of functional ribosomes also requires magnesium.

Yale postdoctoral fellow Mauricio Pontes has discovered a genetic “program” that enables cells to make functioning ribosomes even when magnesium is scarce.

The first step involves activation of genes that inhibit ATP production. Because a large fraction of cellular magnesium is associated with ATP, a decrease in ATP levels makes magnesium available for ribosome assembly. Less ATP, however results in less energy, so fewer ribosomes are produced. However, without this program, cells create more ribosomal precursors but, lacking magnesium, they cannot produce functioning ribosomes, thereby hindering the creation of proteins. 

“It is a clear case of less is more,” said Eduardo Groisman, professor of microbial pathogenesis and senior author of the paper published Oct. 13 in the journal Molecular Cell.

Advertisement