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Looking Inside the Brain to Distinguish Bipolar from Depression

News   Sep 05, 2018 | Original story by Westmead Institute

 
Looking Inside the Brain to Distinguish Bipolar from Depression

In people with bipolar disorder, the left side of the amygdala is less active and less connected with other parts of the brain than in people with depression. Credit: Dr Korgaonkar/Westmead Institute of Medical Research and the University of Sydney

 
 
 

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