We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Molecular Sensing to Commercialize New Biosensor Technology Exclusively Licensed from Vanderbilt University
News

Molecular Sensing to Commercialize New Biosensor Technology Exclusively Licensed from Vanderbilt University

Molecular Sensing to Commercialize New Biosensor Technology Exclusively Licensed from Vanderbilt University
News

Molecular Sensing to Commercialize New Biosensor Technology Exclusively Licensed from Vanderbilt University

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Molecular Sensing to Commercialize New Biosensor Technology Exclusively Licensed from Vanderbilt University"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Molecular Sensing, Inc. has announced that it has been granted an exclusive license from Vanderbilt University to further develop and commercialize a new biosensor platform based on back-scattering interferometry (BSI).

MSI plans to produce biosensor products for research, diagnostic, biodefense and pharmacogenomic applications. MSI is an early stage company located in Montara, California in the San Francisco bay area.

The on-line edition of Science reported that BSI technology enables free-solution, label-free, molecular interaction kinetic and endpoint assays at zeptomole levels of sensitivity, using a biosensor with a simple optical train comprised of a He-Ne laser, a microfluidic channel, and a position sensor.

Measurement of the rate and affinity of biomolecular interactions, such as protein-protein interactions, small molecule-protein interactions, DNA-DNA and DNA-protein binding, not only provides insight into basic cellular function, but can facilitate the development of therapeutics and diagnostics and serve as the basis for many research, diagnostic and pharmacogenomic assays.

Scot R. Weinberger, President & CEO of Molecular Sensing states, “Molecular Sensing’s products will provide life science and medical researchers a platform that has significant advantages over ELISA as well as label-free, molecular interaction biosensor approaches such as microcalorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and other wave-guide technologies.

BSI provides zeptomole sensitivity, uses very small sample volumes (< 2 microliters), and requires little apriori knowledge of the molecular interactors, significantly accelerating assay development. BSI can measure over six logs of equilibrium dissociation constants, and operates in both free-solution and surfacebound modes.”

Weinberger further states, “MSI plans to develop manual and automated, multiplexed systems for research, near-patient clinical diagnostic testing, as well as industrial and bio-defense point of analysis applications.

Our first generation manual, benchtop research product is initially targeted for assay development in basic and translational research, pharmaceutical, and clinical diagnostic applications.”

The company is seeking interested laboratories to participate in our fee-based, technology early access program in these areas.

Advertisement