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New CBT resource shows promise in reducing children's dental anxiety
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New CBT resource shows promise in reducing children's dental anxiety

New CBT resource shows promise in reducing children's dental anxiety
News

New CBT resource shows promise in reducing children's dental anxiety

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The International and American Associations for Dental Research have published a a new study describing the development of a guided self-help cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) resource for the management of children's dental anxiety.


The work from Jenny Porritt, Department of Psychology, Sociology, and Politics, Sheffield Hallam University, UK and colleagues provides preliminary evidence for the feasibility and acceptability of this approach with children aged between nine and 16 years.


See Also: Mindfulness treatment as effective as CBT for depression and anxiety


CBT is an evidence-based treatment for dental anxiety; however, access to therapy is limited.


This study employed a mixed methods design where within phase one, a qualitative "person-based" approach informed the development of the self-help CBT resource. Guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions were also used.


Within phase two, children aged between nine and 16 years who had elevated self-reported dental anxiety and were attending a community dental service or dental hospital were invited to use the CBT resource. Children completed questionnaires, which assessed their dental anxiety and health-related quality of life prior to and following their use of the resource. Recruitment and completion rates were also recorded.


Acceptability of the CBT resource was explored using interviews and focus groups with children, parents/caregivers and dental professionals. A total of 85 children were invited to participate in the feasibility study and trial the CBT resource.


The recruitment rate (proportion of children invited to take part in the study who agreed to participate) and completion rate (proportion of children who agreed to participate who completed the study) was 66 percent and 86 percent, respectively. A total of 48 patients completed the study.


Read Next: Low attention control in early adolescence is a genetic risk factor for anxiety disorders


At the conclusion of the study, the authors ascertained that there was a significant reduction in dental anxiety and an increase in health-related quality of life following the use of the guided self-help cognitive behavioral therapy resource. The results of this study will inform the design of a definitive trial to examine the treatment and cost-effectiveness of the resource for the reduction of children's dental anxiety.


Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.


International & American Associations for Dental Research   press release


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