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Scientists develop new mouse model to study Salmonella meningitis
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Scientists develop new mouse model to study Salmonella meningitis

Scientists develop new mouse model to study Salmonella meningitis
News

Scientists develop new mouse model to study Salmonella meningitis

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National Institutes of Health (NIH, US) scientists have established in mice a way to study potentially life-threatening meningitis caused by Salmonella.


Bacterial meningitis happens when bacteria infect the central nervous system (CNS), causing a serious disease that can be life-threatening and difficult to diagnose and treat. Patients who survive often have permanent brain damage.


See Also: Meningitis model shows infection’s sci-fi-worthy creep into the brain


Salmonella typhimurium is one of the most common causes of food-borne disease in the United States and often causes a self-limiting gastrointestinal (GI) infection. However, in people with impaired immune responses, Salmonella typhimurium can cause severe systemic infections, spreading through the blood to other organs.


In some cases, the bacteria spread to the CNS, causing meningitis. People at risk include the very young and the elderly, people with advanced HIV/AIDS, and those with sickle cell disease. Salmonella meningitis, which was rare globally, is now one of the most common forms of bacterial meningitis in parts of Africa and has a high case fatality rate.


Researchers at NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) infected mice orally with Salmonella typhimurium to mimic food-borne infection. They found that Salmonella moved from the GI tract to the blood and then to the brain, resulting in meningitis.


Damage observed in the brains of Salmonella-infected mice resembled that observed with human meningitis, providing a new model for investigators to study human disease.


Collaborators include Salmonella and neuroimmunology experts at NIAID's Rocky Mountain Laboratories and biologists at the University of Colorado.


Read Next: Pilot study successfully uses DNA sequencing to diagnose brain infections


They plan to use the model to determine how Salmonella typhimurium infects and causes damage in the brain, including which immune cells are involved. They also will use the model to study potential treatments to prevent Salmonella from gaining access to the CNS or limiting the damage during meningitis.


Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.


NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases   press release


Publication

Bauler TJ et al. Salmonella Meningitis Associated with Monocyte Infiltration in Mice.  American Journal of Pathology, Published Online December 9 2016. doi: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2016.09.002


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