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Scientists Look to Venomous Cone Snails For Novel Therapeutics

News   Oct 11, 2017 | Original Story by The National Institute of Standards and Technology

 
Scientists Look to Venomous Cone Snails For Novel Therapeutics

In the wild, cone snails harpoon their prey as it swims by. In the lab, the cone snail has learned to exchange venom for dinner. Here, a snail extends its proboscis and discharges a shot of venom into a latex-topped tube. Credit: Alex Holt/NIST.

 
 
 

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