We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Transplantation with induced neural stem cells improves stroke recovery in mice
News

Transplantation with induced neural stem cells improves stroke recovery in mice

Transplantation with induced neural stem cells improves stroke recovery in mice
News

Transplantation with induced neural stem cells improves stroke recovery in mice

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Transplantation with induced neural stem cells improves stroke recovery in mice "

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Results showed cells to be effective in promoting functional recovery and survival in mice modeled with stroke, and may even be protective when administered early  -


In a study to determine whether induced neural stem cells (iNSCs), a type of somatic cell directly differentiated into neural stem cells, could exert therapeutic effects when transplanted into mice modeled with ischemic stroke, researchers found that the cells promoted survival and functional recovery. Additionally, they discovered that when administered during the acute phase of stroke, iNSCs protected the brain from ischemia-related damage.


See Also: Unlocking the potential of stem cells to repair brain damage


In contrast to other studies that have induced somatic cells to become pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which can then be differentiated into neural cells, this study directly converted somatic cells into neural stem cells. Researchers concluded that in addition to iNSC transplantation improving survival rate, results also demonstrated reduced infarct volume in the brain and enhanced sensorimotor function in the mice modeled with stroke.


The study is to be published in Cell Transplantation.


"We observed multiple therapeutic effects when using these cells to treat stroke in mice," said Dr. Koji Abe, Department of Neurology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Science. "The iNSCs did not produce any adverse responses in the animals, including tumor formation, which may suggest they are safer than regular iPSCs. Further studies are needed to confirm this cell type as a candidate for cell replacement therapy for stroke."


Read Next: Human stem cell-derived neuron transplants reduce seizures in mice


"Use of iNSCs may improve the efficacy of cell transplantation procedures for stroke since they are able to be derived directly from other cells without the need for extra steps," said Dr. Shinn-Zong (John) Lin, Tzu Chi Hospital, Hualien City, Taiwan. "This is highly desirable in stroke, which has a narrow window in which the brain is most responsive to treatment. Whether the therapeutic effects produced by iNSCs are attributable to cell replacement or to secreted factors (paracrine effects), this method may be promising for treating stroke early."


Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.


Cell Transplantation Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair  


Publication

Yamashita T et al. Novel therapeutic transplantation of induced neural stem cells for stroke.   Cell Transplantation, Published Online September 20 2016. doi: 10.3727/096368916X692988


Advertisement