We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Urinary 1H-NMR Metabolomics can Distinguish Pancreatitis Patients from Healthy Controls
News

Urinary 1H-NMR Metabolomics can Distinguish Pancreatitis Patients from Healthy Controls

Urinary 1H-NMR Metabolomics can Distinguish Pancreatitis Patients from Healthy Controls
News

Urinary 1H-NMR Metabolomics can Distinguish Pancreatitis Patients from Healthy Controls

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Urinary 1H-NMR Metabolomics can Distinguish Pancreatitis Patients from Healthy Controls"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Objectives:
We establish a non-invasive technique to compare urinary metabolic profiles in patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis to healthy controls.

Methods:
Urine was obtained from healthy controls (HC, n=5), inpatients with mild acute pancreatitis (AP, n=5), and outpatients with chronic pancreatitis (CP, n=5). Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained for each sample. Metabolites were identified and quantified in each spectrum; resulting concentrations were normalized to account for differences in dilution among samples. Kruskal-Wallis test, post-hoc Mann-Whitney U tests, and principal component analysis were performed to identify metabolites that discriminate healthy controls, acute pancreatitis, and chronic pancreatitis.

Results:
Sixty metabolites were identified and quantified; five were found to differ significantly (P<0.05) among the three groups. Of these, citrate and adenosine remained significant after validation by random permutation. Principal component analysis demonstrated that healthy control urine samples can be differentiated from patients with chronic pancreatitis or acute pancreatitis; chronic pancreatitis patients could not be distinguished from acute pancreatitis patients.

Conclusions:
This metabolomic investigation demonstrates that this non-invasive technique offers insight into the metabolic states of pancreatitis. Although the identified metabolites cannot conclusively be defined as biomarkers of disease, future studies will validate our findings in larger patient cohorts.

The article is published online in Journal of the Pancreas and is free to access.

Advertisement