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Xenogen Announces Second Agreement With Gene Logic
News

Xenogen Announces Second Agreement With Gene Logic

Xenogen Announces Second Agreement With Gene Logic
News

Xenogen Announces Second Agreement With Gene Logic

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Xenogen Corporation has announced an agreement with Gene Logic Inc. Xenogen Biosciences Corporation, Xenogen's wholly owned subsidiary, is producing and characterizing lines of custom-produced bioluminescent animal models for Gene Logic.

This deal follows a November 2004 agreement in which Gene Logic purchased Xenogen equipment and licensed Xenogen's proprietary biophotonic imaging technology.

Gene Logic has integrated Xenogen's technology into its Drug Repositioning and Selection™ (DRS) collaborations.

Under the November 2004 agreement, Gene Logic purchased Xenogen's biophotonic imaging systems, IVIS® Imaging System 200 Series, and licensed the company's Living Image® Software and patented methods of biophotonic imaging.

Under the April 2005 agreement, Gene Logic received a license grant to the customized bioluminescent animal models it is producing together with Xenogen Biosciences for use in Gene Logic's DRS collaborations.

Gene Logic has combined its own proprietary imaging methods with Xenogen's technology to form an important part of its overall drug- repositioning platform.

“Xenogen's biophotonic imaging technology is one of a number of key technologies that we are in-licensing and/or developing for our new repositioning and selection program,” said Louis Tartaglia, Ph.D., senior vice president and general manager, Drug Repositioning and Selection for Gene Logic.

“This technology, in combination with proprietary methods developed at Gene Logic, provides us with an important new way of non-invasively imaging whole animals over time and essentially lighting up the biological processes or responses to the compound we're testing.”

“We believe this will help us generate valuable predictive data on how a drug affects the whole system. These data are not available with conventional research methods.”

Gene Logic's DRS collaborations are based, in part, on technologies the company acquired in 2004 from Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

These technologies include in vivo real-time imaging; disease metabolomics; disease- relevant in vitro pathway and cellular screening; and predictive and genetic ADME.

When combined with Gene Logic's existing genomics and toxicogenomics capabilities and in silico analysis, DRS collaborations are designed to enable Gene Logic to help pharmaceutical partners identify alternative indications for failed, stalled or de-prioritized drug candidates, expand indications for currently marketed drugs, and prioritize and identify indications for drug candidates entering pre-clinical development.

“Gene Logic has developed an exciting new business and scientific opportunity to reposition drug compounds for new indications, and we are pleased that our technology can play a role in that effort,” said Pamela Contag, Ph.D., president of Xenogen Corporation.

“Gene Logic recognized the benefits of Xenogen's non-invasive molecular and functional imaging technology for prioritizing targets and compound indications early in the drug discovery and development process or later in the process to find new development paths for clinical-stage drug candidates.”

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