We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Screening for Protein Aggregation Using Dynamic Light Scattering
Product News

Screening for Protein Aggregation Using Dynamic Light Scattering

Screening for Protein Aggregation Using Dynamic Light Scattering
Product News

Screening for Protein Aggregation Using Dynamic Light Scattering


Want a FREE PDF version of This Product News?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Screening for Protein Aggregation Using Dynamic Light Scattering"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Testa Analytical Solutions reports on interest from protein scientists to use Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) as a tool for screening for the presence of aggregates, as it is extremely sensitive to these larger compounds.

Applications Lab Manager Raffaele Carano said "Protein aggregation is a common challenge in the manufacturing of biological products. Protein scientists particularly like DLS because it provides them with a simple, fast and non-destructive test for aggregate detection, where the very same sample can also be used for Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) or Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) experiments".

He added "SAXS or SANS are powerful techniques used to extract structural parameters and determine the overall structures and shapes of biological macromolecules, complexes and assemblies in solution. The presence of aggregates is known to negatively affect SAXS and SANS results, consequently, scientists can use DLS as a selection tool to make sure protein samples are “good” candidates for their measurements".

The NanoBrook 90Plus particle size analyzer is designed for fast, routine, sub-micron measurements. Based on the principles of Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), most measurements only take a minute or two. Protein aggregation in samples can occur due to changes in pH or temperature. The NanoBrook 90Plus in association with an autotitrator could be a suitable system for monitoring protein samples for aggregation.


Advertisement