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Zombie Neuroscience

Video   Oct 31, 2017 | TEDxDublin

 

In this excellent Tedx Talk, Professor Shane O'Mara from Trinity College Dublin explains the likely cognitive damage caused to the brains of humans to turn them into zombies. 

Shane O'Mara is Professor of Experimental Brain Research at the School of Psychology in Trinity College Dublin, and the Director of the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience. Shane's research centres on examining how the brain makes memories. He explores what life would be like without memory, our enduring personal record of our hopes, experiences, desires, wishes, needs, loves and hatreds. He is particularly interested in how memories are encoded by neurons in the brain, and how this encoding is affected by psychiatric or other conditions. Shane is also interested in public policy applications and counterfactual interpretations of neuroscience, and has published over 100 papers in these areas. In this video, he addresses one of the most interesting recent developments in neuroscience: the zombie brain.

In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)




 
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