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Dynamics of Oligodendrocyte Generation and Myelination in the Human Brain
Article

Dynamics of Oligodendrocyte Generation and Myelination in the Human Brain

Dynamics of Oligodendrocyte Generation and Myelination in the Human Brain
Article

Dynamics of Oligodendrocyte Generation and Myelination in the Human Brain

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Maggie S.Y. Yeung, Sofia Zdunek, Olaf Bergmann, Samuel Bernard, Mehran Salehpour, Kanar Alkass, Shira Perl, John Tisdale, Göran Possnert, Lou Brundin, Henrik Druid, Jonas Frisén
Cell
November 2014

Summary:  The myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes has been suggested to be modulated by experience, which could mediate neural plasticity by optimizing the performance of the circuitry. We have assessed the dynamics of oligodendrocyte generation and myelination in the human brain. The number of oligodendrocytes in the corpus callosum is established in childhood and remains stable after that. Analysis of the integration of nuclear bomb test-derived 14C revealed that myelin is exchanged at a high rate, whereas the oligodendrocyte population in white matter is remarkably stable in humans, with an annual exchange of 1/300 oligodendrocytes. We conclude that oligodendrocyte turnover contributes minimally to myelin modulation in human white matter and that this instead may be carried out by mature oligodendrocytes, which may facilitate rapid neural plasticity.


http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cell.2014.10.011


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