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A Vital Pause: Circuitry that enables you to drop what you're doing -mapped

News   May 10, 2018 | by Andrew Scott for Okinawa Institute for Science and Technology Graduate University

 
A Vital Pause: Neurons in the Brain’s Striatum May Help Regulate Response to Unexpected Stimuli

Florescent imaging of a section of the striatum showing Cholinergic Interneurons (CINs) in green, and Spiny Projection Neurons (SPNs) in red. Credit: OIST

 
 
 

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