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Addicted to Sun-Seeking? Your Genes Are To Blame
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Addicted to Sun-Seeking? Your Genes Are To Blame

Addicted to Sun-Seeking? Your Genes Are To Blame
News

Addicted to Sun-Seeking? Your Genes Are To Blame

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Sun-seeking behaviour is linked to genes involved in addiction, behavioural and personality traits and brain function, according to a study of more than 260,000 people led by King's College London researchers.

This means that people's behaviour towards seeking sun is complicated by a genetic predisposition, and this needs to be taken into account when designing skin cancer awareness campaigns.

The researchers studied detailed health information of 2,500 twins from TwinsUK, including their sun-seeking behaviour and genetics. Identical twins in a pair were more likely to have a similar sun-seeking behaviour than non-identical twins, indicating that genetics play a key role.

The team then identified five key genes involved in sun-seeking behaviour from a further analysis of 260,000 participants from other cohorts. Some of these genes have been linked to behavioural traits associated with risk-taking and addiction, including smoking, cannabis and alcohol consumption and number of sexual partners.

Senior author Dr Mario Falchi from King's College London said: "Our results suggest that tackling excessive sun exposure or use of tanning beds might be more challenging than expected, as it is influenced by genetic factors. It is important for the public to be aware of this predisposition, as it could make people more mindful of their behaviour and the potential harms of excessive sun exposure."

Dr Veronique Bataille, Consultant Dermatologist involved in the research from King's College London added: "It is clear that we see individuals who have very unhealthy sun behaviour and are fully aware of it. They will continue to expose themselves excessively even if they have clear skin cancer risk factors. Our research shows that genes regulating addiction and other risky behaviour are important and may explain some of the reticence in changing behaviours in the sun."

Reference: 

Marianna S, Xin L, Alessia V, et al. Looking for Sunshine: Genetic Predisposition to Sun-Seeking in 265,000 Individuals of European Ancestry. J Invest Dermatol. 2020;0(0). doi:10.1016/j.jid.2020.08.014

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.
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