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Alcohol-induced Brain Damage Might Continue for Weeks During Abstinence

News   Apr 04, 2019 | Original story from the Spanish National Research Council

 
Alcohol-induced Brain Damage Might Continue for Weeks During Abstinence

Microstructural changes in brain white matter in human alcoholics (a) and alcohol exposed rats (b), measured using the diffusion tensor imaging to provide an index of microstructural integrity. The observed changes further progress after two weeks of abstinence in both species, as shown in panels c for humans, and d for rats. The results challenge the current view that alterations in the brain begin to normalize immediately after quitting alcohol and warn that persistent brain deficits can occur much earlier than is currently believed. Credit: Silvia de Santis

 
 
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