We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Altered Hand Movements May Be Signs of Sport-related Concussions
News

Altered Hand Movements May Be Signs of Sport-related Concussions

Altered Hand Movements May Be Signs of Sport-related Concussions
News

Altered Hand Movements May Be Signs of Sport-related Concussions

Credit: German Sport University
Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Altered Hand Movements May Be Signs of Sport-related Concussions"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Concussions are a regular occurrence in sport but more so in contact sports such as American football, ice hockey or soccer. The problem of diagnosing concussion is often complicated if the collision happens during a competition or training. Dr. Ingo Helmich’s current study suggests clear markers for a diagnostic criterion. Helmich has been able to show that nonverbal hand movements differ between athletes with and without concussion.

Ever since the German midfielder, Christoph Kramer suffered a black-out in the final of the 2014 Football World Cup there has been a growing number of debates around the question of sport-related concussion. The emphasis here is on correct diagnosis. There are plenty of symptoms, but these can be ambiguous.

Researchers of the Department of Neurology, Psychosomatics and Psychiatry of the Institute for Exercise Therapy and Movement-Oriented Prevention and Rehabilitation have now been able to find evidence for their hypothesis, that non-verbal hand movement behavior offers additional information concerning the state of health of the athletes, but specifically with respect to possible post-concussion symptoms.

Helmich and his team compared the hand movements of symptomatic and asymptomatic athletes after concussion. The findings show that non-verbal behavior and hand movements differ between the two groups, in that symptomatic athletes are more likely to perform so-called “motion quality presentation gestures” which provide information on the athletes’ post-concussion motor sensory experience.

The study provides evidence of significant non-verbal gestures and behavior differences between people with and without concussion which can serve as behavioral markers for sports-related concussions and so improve diagnosis.

Reference

Helmich et al. (2019) Symptoms after sport-related concussions alter gestural functions. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2019.11.013

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Advertisement