We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Is MS an Autoimmune Disease? These Scientist's Don't Think So

News   May 09, 2018 | Original Story by Kelly Johnston for the University of Calgary

 
Biochemically Altered Myelin Triggers MS, Not Autoimmune Attack

The Dr. Peter Stys lab within the Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, is equipped with highly specialized microscopes used for researching multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative disease. In this customized lab, the researchers can’t wear white lab coats, they have to wear dark clothing. Photons could reflect off light clothing and interfere with the experiments. From left: Megan Morgan, research assistant, and Craig Brideau, engineering scientist. Credit: Pauline Zulueta, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary

 
 
 

RELATED ARTICLES

New Alzheimer's Blood Test To Start Clinical Study in Autumn

News

Researchers have used a method to develop a new blood marker capable of detecting whether or not a person has Alzheimer’s disease. If the method is approved for clinical use, the researchers hope eventually to see it used as a diagnostic tool in primary healthcare. This autumn, they will start a trial in primary healthcare to test the technique.

READ MORE

Clinical Trial Assessing Treatments for Preventing People at High Risk From Developing Multidrug-resistant TB Launches

News

A large clinical trial to assess treatments for preventing people at high risk from developing multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has begun. The study is comparing the safety and efficacy of a new MDR-TB drug, delamanid, with the decades-old TB drug isoniazid for preventing active MDR-TB disease in children, adolescents and adults at high risk who are exposed to adult household members with MDR-TB.

READ MORE

"Peter Pan" Neurons Stay Young Through Life

News

Researchers have discovered a mysterious group of neurons in the amygdala -- a key center for emotional processing in the brain -- that stay in an immature, prenatal developmental state throughout childhood

READ MORE

 

Like what you just read? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Analysis & Separations Diagnostics Drug Discovery Neuroscience Immunology & Microbiology

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE