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Scientists Reveal We Stop Making New Neurons in Our Brain's Memory Centre as Early as Childhood

News   Mar 08, 2018 | Original Story by Nicholas Weiler for UCSF

 
Birth of New Neurons in the Human Hippocampus Ends in Childhood

Young neurons (green) are shown in the human hippocampus at the ages of (from left) birth, 13 years old and 35 years old. Images by Arturo Alvarez-Buylla lab

 
 
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