Brain Guides Embryo Development

News   Sep 25, 2017 | Original Story from Tufts University

 
Brain Engaged in Embryo Development Earlier Than Previously Thought

New research from Tufts University biologists shows that the nascent brain shapes normal body patterning and protects against developmental defects while the brain itself is still developing and before the animal shows any behaviors. Without a brain, frog embryos exposed to a teratogen developed an abnormal, curled tail and spine. In contrast, embryos with brains developed normal tails and spines (inset) even after exposure to the same teratogen. Tufts researchers were able to rescue defects by administering treatments already approved for use in humans. Credit: Celia Herrera-Rincon/Tufts University

 
 
 

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