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Dow Neurobiology Laboratories Extends their MetaCore Licenses from GeneGo
News

Dow Neurobiology Laboratories Extends their MetaCore Licenses from GeneGo

Dow Neurobiology Laboratories Extends their MetaCore Licenses from GeneGo
News

Dow Neurobiology Laboratories Extends their MetaCore Licenses from GeneGo

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GeneGo, Inc. has announced that Robert S. Dow Neurobiology Laboratories extended their MetaCore license.

Scientists in RSDNL have been using MetaCore for analysis of proteomics and gene expression data for understanding ischemic brain injury and its prevention.

"During the past year, we have used MetaCore in analyzing our quantitative proteomic data on ischemic rodent brains," said Dr. An Zhou, a scientist at the RSDNL.

"MetaCore allows us to efficiently handle multiple sets of high throughput proteomic data with statistics and visual presentation, as well as to identify pathways and networks that are unique to different ischemic conditions of the brain."

"Research at the Robert S. Dow Neurobiology Labs," said Dr. Roger Simon, the director of RSDNL, "is concerned with the anatomic, physiologic and neuropathologic aspects of brain and nervous system function, with a focused emphasis on the molecular and cellular mechanisms of neuronal injury and repair that are manifest in stroke and epilepsy."

"The proteomic and genomic responses to ischemia and particularly the phenomenon of ischemic tolerance and its neuroprotective mechanisms in the brain, are areas of concentrated interest."

"Currently there are multiple NIH-funded studies in the RSDNL that address proteomic and genomic changes in the brain after ischemia."

"The other areas of research interest in the RSDNL include epileptic and traumatic brain injury."

"We are pleased to see more researchers using proteomics data as well as expression data in design of their experiments," said Julie Bryant, Vice President of Business Development at GeneGo.

"Comparing multiple data types is essential; equally important is to depict pathways and networks for biologically meaningful data integration."

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