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Editing Consciousness: How Bereaved People Control Their Thoughts without Knowing It

News   Dec 10, 2018 | Original story by Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

 
Editing Consciousness: How Bereaved People Control Their Thoughts without Knowing It

A control process (i.e. selective attention) is used by avoidant grievers to block mental representations (i.e. thoughts of the deceased loved one) from entering consciousness (yellow section). When this is happening avoidant grievers are suppressing (yellow section) this suppression likely exhausts energy and ultimately leads to the mental representations breaking through attempted control and reaching consciousness (red section). Contrasting avoidant grievers those with a less avoidant style simply focus on what is in front of them without trying to monitor their internal mental state as much (blue section). Credit: Noam Schneck/Columbia Engineering

 
 
 

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