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How well did web-based cognitive therapy work for insomnia?
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How well did web-based cognitive therapy work for insomnia?

How well did web-based cognitive therapy work for insomnia?
News

How well did web-based cognitive therapy work for insomnia?

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How well did a web-based cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia intervention work in a randomized clinical trial?


A new article published in JAMA Psychiatry reports that adults assigned to receive the fully automated and interactive web-based Sleep Healthy Using the Internet (SHUTi) intervention had improved sleep compared with those adults just given access to a patient education website with information about insomnia.


See Also: Twin study suggests genetic factors contribute to insomnia in children, teens


Difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep is a common health problem with medical, psychiatric and financial ramifications.


The clinical trial by Lee Ritterband, PhD, of the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, USA, evaluated the efficacy of the intervention from nine weeks to one year and included 303 adults. The article includes study limitations.


Read Next: Insomnia linked to damage in brain communication networks


"Internet-delivered CBT-I [cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia] provides a less expensive, scalable treatment option that could reach previously unimaginable numbers of people. Future studies are necessary to determine who may be best served by this type of intervention and how the next steps of dissemination should occur," the study concludes.


Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.


The JAMA Network


Publication

Ritterband LM et al. Effect of a Web-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia Intervention With 1-Year Follow-up: Randomized Clinical Trial.   JAMA Psychiatry, Published Online November 30 2016. doi: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.3249


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