We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
No risk association observed for anthracycline chemotherapy, cognitive decline
News

No risk association observed for anthracycline chemotherapy, cognitive decline

No risk association observed for anthracycline chemotherapy, cognitive decline
News

No risk association observed for anthracycline chemotherapy, cognitive decline

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "No risk association observed for anthracycline chemotherapy, cognitive decline "

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

New data analyses found no association between anthracycline chemotherapy and greater risk of cognitive decline in breast cancer survivors, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.


Possible adverse effects of breast cancer treatment on cognitive function have been acknowledged but the risks of specific chemotherapies remain undetermined.


See Also: Researchers pinpoint chemo effect on brain cells, potential link to autism


Patricia A. Ganz, MD, of the University of California, Los Angeles' Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, and coauthors conducted a secondary analysis of Mind Body Study data to examine the risk of lasting cognitive decline with anthracycline-based chemotherapy.


Breast cancer survivors had baseline neuropsychological evaluations within three months after primary treatments (n=190), at six months (n=173), at one year (n=173) and at an average of 4.8 years after treatment (n=102). The neuropsychological tested picked for the analyses measured memory, processing speed and executive function.


The authors report that cognitive function after cancer treatment in memory, processing speeds and executive function was comparable among those women who received chemotherapy with or without anthracycline and those who did not receive chemotherapy. Over time, cognitive function also was comparable between the groups up to seven years after treatment, according to the study. The authors also note that they did not find an association between anthracycline exposure and neuropsychological performance on any measure they examined.


Learn More: ‘Chemo brain’ is real, say researchers


The authors acknowledge their study results are in contrast to other findings.


"In conclusion, in this study we could not find evidence to support the claim that anthracycline treatment confers greater risk of cognitive decline for breast cancer survivors," the study concludes.


Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

The JAMA Network Journals


Publication

Van Dyk K, Petersen L, Ganz PA. Comparison of Neurocognitive Function After Anthracycline-Based Chemotherapy vs Nonanthracycline-Based Chemotherapy.   JAMA Oncology, Published Online April 21 2016. doi: 10.1001/jamaoncol.2016.0350


Advertisement