We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Overcoming Tropism in Retrograde Brain Cell Circuit Tracing

News   Jun 07, 2018 | Original Story by Peter Tarr for Cold Spring Harbour Laboratory

 
Overcoming Tropism in Retrograde Brain Cell Circuit Tracing

These images demonstrate the increased efficiency of the improved retrograde viral tracing method introduced by the Kepecs lab at CSHL. While in one register, a classic tracer (bottom right) performs about as well as the improved one (top right), the improved tracer records neurons far more robustly (top middle) in a different register (green dots). Both tracers were injected in the same place and traced neuronal connections between the basolateral amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex. Credit: Kepecs Lab, CSHL

 
 
 

RELATED ARTICLES

Workers Who Commute Through Nature Report Better Mental Health

News

People who commute through natural environments report better mental health, research based on questionnaires answered by nearly 3,600 participants from four European cities has concluded.


READ MORE

The Electric Signals That Make the Human Brain Unique

News

Neurons in the human brain receive electrical signals from thousands of other cells, and long neural extensions called dendrites play a critical role in incorporating all of that information. Using hard-to-obtain samples of human brain tissue, MIT neuroscientists have now discovered that human dendrites have different electrical properties from those of other species.

READ MORE

Astrocytes Show Unexpected Role in Brain Plasticity

News

When we’re born, our brains have a great deal of flexibility. Having this flexibility to grow and change gives the immature brain the ability to adapt to new experiences and organize its interconnecting web of neural circuits. As we age, this quality, called “plasticity,” lessens. Now, a study has shown that supportive astrocyte cells help enable this plasticity.

READ MORE

 

Like what you just read? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Neuroscience

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE