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Overcoming Tropism in Retrograde Brain Cell Circuit Tracing

News   Jun 07, 2018 | Original Story by Peter Tarr for Cold Spring Harbour Laboratory

 
Overcoming Tropism in Retrograde Brain Cell Circuit Tracing

These images demonstrate the increased efficiency of the improved retrograde viral tracing method introduced by the Kepecs lab at CSHL. While in one register, a classic tracer (bottom right) performs about as well as the improved one (top right), the improved tracer records neurons far more robustly (top middle) in a different register (green dots). Both tracers were injected in the same place and traced neuronal connections between the basolateral amygdala and the medial prefrontal cortex. Credit: Kepecs Lab, CSHL

 
 
 

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