We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Prion disease detected soon after infection and in surprising place in mouse brains
News

Prion disease detected soon after infection and in surprising place in mouse brains

Prion disease detected soon after infection and in surprising place in mouse brains
News

Prion disease detected soon after infection and in surprising place in mouse brains

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Prion disease detected soon after infection and in surprising place in mouse brains "

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

Prion diseases--incurable, ultimately fatal, transmissible neurodegenerative disorders of mammals--are believed to develop undetected in the brain over several years from infectious prion protein. In a new study, National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists report they can detect infectious prion protein in mouse brains within a week of inoculation. Equally surprising, the protein was generated outside blood vessels in a place in the brain where scientists believe drug treatment could be targeted to prevent disease. The study, from NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), appears in the jounral mBio.


Scientists believe prion diseases potentially could be treated if therapy starts early in the disease cycle. However, identifying who needs treatment and pinpointing the optimal timeframe for treatment are open questions for researchers.


Human prion diseases include variant, familial and sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The most common form, sporadic CJD, affects an estimated one in one million people annually worldwide. Other prion diseases include scrapie in sheep, chronic wasting disease in deer, elk and moose, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle.


In their study, the NIAID scientists injected infectious scrapie prion protein into the brains of mice. After 30 minutes, they began observing whether the injected material generated new infectious protein at the injection site. By examining mouse brain tissue, the researchers measured and detected new infectious prion protein three days after infection on the outside walls of capillaries and other blood vessels at the injection site. Using Real-Time Quaking-Induced Conversion (RT-QuIC), a feasible testing method for people, the scientists detected newly generated prion protein after seven days. In prior studies, it took about six weeks to detect infectious prion protein. The new findings enhance scientific understanding of where infectious prion diseases might take hold in the brain and provide possible targets for treatment.


Note: Material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

NIH / National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases   press release


Publication

Race B et al. Early Generation of New PrPSc on Blood Vessels after Brain Microinjection of Scrapie in Mice.   mBio, Published September 22 2015. doi: 10.1128/mBio.01419-15


Advertisement