We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Signals From Skeletal Muscle Protect Against Dementia
News

Signals From Skeletal Muscle Protect Against Dementia

Signals From Skeletal Muscle Protect Against Dementia
News

Signals From Skeletal Muscle Protect Against Dementia

Research in the lab of Fabio Demontis, PhD, of Developmental Neurobiology, used immunostaining and confocal microscopy on fruit fly brain and retina cells to show that Amyrel reduces the accumulation of protein aggregates seen in red and yellow. Credit: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Signals From Skeletal Muscle Protect Against Dementia"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

How do different parts of the body communicate? Scientists at St. Jude are studying how signals sent from skeletal muscle affect the brain.

The team studied fruit flies and cutting-edge brain cell models called organoids. They focused on the signals muscles send when stressed. The researchers found that stress signals rely on an enzyme called Amyrel amylase and its product, the disaccharide maltose.

The scientists showed that mimicking the stress signals can protect the brain and retina from aging. The signals work by preventing the buildup of misfolded protein aggregates. Findings suggest that tailoring this signaling may potentially help combat neurodegenerative conditions like age-related dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

"We found that a stress response induced in muscle could impact not only the muscle but also promote protein quality control in distant tissues like the brain and retina," said Fabio Demontis, PhD, of St. Jude Developmental Neurobiology. "This stress response was actually protecting those tissues during aging."

Reference: 1.

Rai M, Coleman Z, Curley M, et al. Proteasome stress in skeletal muscle mounts a long-range protective response that delays retinal and brain aging. Cell Metabolism. Published online March 26, 2021. doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2021.03.005


This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Advertisement