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Connectomics Explained by a Neuroscientist in 5 Levels of Complexity

Video   Jun 08, 2017

 

In this video from WIRED, neuroscientist Bobby Kasthuri explains the concept of connectomics to a 5 year-old, a 13 year-old, a college student, a neuroscience grad student and an entrepreneur that wants to help you 'back-up your brain'. 


Connectomics is the study of the connectome, which is a map of how all the cells in our brains are connected. There are estimated to be ~100 trillion synapses in the brain. Mapping such a vast number of connections and understanding their roles in brain computation and processing is a daunting task and is a huge area of intense neuroscience research. Having a definitive wiring guide of brain circuitry will aid in our understanding of brain function, and help in developing treatments for neurodevelopmental and psychological disorders.

Read more: complexity of cortical connectome map 

Also: fly through brain circuitry

 
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