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How Does Solid Stress from Brain Tumors Damage Healthy Tissue?

Video   Jan 21, 2019 | Original Video from MassGeneralHospital via Youtube

 

A Mass. General Hospital study reveals how solid stress from nodular brain tumors compresses adjacent healthy tissue, restricts blood supply and damages neurons. The psychiatric drug lithium may be able to reduce these effects. (Giorgio Seano, PhD, Steele Laboratories of Tumor Biology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital)

Reference:
Seano, G., Nia, H. T., Emblem, K. E., Datta, M., Ren, J., Krishnan, S., … Jain, R. K. (2019). Solid stress in brain tumours causes neuronal loss and neurological dysfunction and can be reversed by lithium. Nature Biomedical Engineering, 1. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41551-018-0334-7
 

 
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