We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Principle Diffusion Direction Imaging Method Explained

Video   Aug 04, 2017

 

Principal Diffusion Direction uses colors to map out the different directions that water molecules diffuse through the brain's white matter. This data is then used to reconstruct 3d representations of white matter tracts.

The colors are used to represent the spatial orientation of the fiber pathways: red is left-to-right in the brain, green is anterior-to-posterior, and blue is inferior-to-superior, in other words, RGB translated to XYZ.

Directed and written by Amanda Hammond. Animation by Carlos Mena. Narration and Music by Ellen Armour. Scientific Consultation by Arthur W. Toga, Ph.D

http://www.humanconnectomeproject.org/

 
More Information
 
 
 

Recommended Videos

Bacterial DNA Jiggling Motion Halted Before Cell Death

Video

Watch how the jiggling motion of bacterial DNA stops when a natural antimicrobial peptide permeates the E. coli membrane. This novel mechanism helps explain why bacteria develop resistance very slowly and may inform the design of new antimicrobial agents.

WATCH NOW

How Do Scientists Know if Plastic Containers are BPA-free? | Behind the Science, S3 Ep5

Video

How do consumer packaging companies test their products to maintain "BPA-free" label claims? VICAM, a division of Waters that develops rapid diagnostics and laboratory sample prep technologies for testing quality and safety in food and agriculture, has a new fit-for-purpose BPA test that pairs immunoaffinity chromatography to extract and elute BPA for subsequent measurement by LC-MS/MS.

WATCH NOW

A Crash Course in Organic Chemistry

Video

Jakob Magolan is here to change your perception of organic chemistry. In an accessible talk packed with striking graphics, he teaches us the basics while breaking the stereotype that organic chemistry is something to be afraid of.

WATCH NOW

 

Like what you just watched? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Analysis & Separations Neuroscience

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE