We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Advertisement

Teach Me in 10 – Cell Senescence, Aging and Disease With Professor Judith Campisi

Video   Jun 18, 2020

 

In this instalment of Teach Me in 10, we are delighted to welcome Professor Judith Campisi from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging.

We all know that an unfortunate side effect of aging is that we become more at risk for developing a wide variety of diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Why is this?

The Campisi lab studies the regulation and characteristics of cell states, focusing particularly on cell senescence, a state of permanent cell cycle arrest. Put simply, cell senescence is when our cells stop dividing.

In this Teach Me in 10 challenge, Professor Campisi explains why cell senescence can be a good and bad thing. She talks us through her laboratory's use of various cell-based and animal models to understand the molecular pathways that drive cellular senescence, and how data from such experiments can helps further our knowledge of the mechanisms behind age-related diseases.

Does removing senescent cells extend lifespan? Watch this instalment of Teach Me in 10 to find out. 





For more 
Teach Me in 10 videos, visit our hub page


 
More Information
 
 
Advertisement
 

Recommended Videos

TSE Explores Cancer Research – What is Cancer?

Video

In this episode we will be speaking with Dr Sam Smith, Yorkshire Cancer Research University Academic Fellow about what cancer is and common misconceptions.

WATCH NOW

How To Achieve Compliance in QC of Nitrogen-containing Compounds

Video

Learn how to implement a fast and fully compliant SOP for testing of pharmaceuticals in your laboratory with our free webinar.

WATCH NOW

ADME 101 Drug Metabolism Webinar: Reaction Phenotyping Studies

Video

It is important to identify the enzymes that significantly contribute to the metabolism of a drug candidate and to evaluate the potential of a drug candidate to be a victim or perpetrator. Knowing how a drug candidate is eliminated by the human body is important in understanding the potential for drug-drug interactions.

WATCH NOW

 

Like what you just watched? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Biopharma Cancer Research Cell Science Diagnostics Drug Discovery Neuroscience

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE