We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Your Belly Controls Your Brain

Video   Feb 28, 2018 | You Tube Video from TEDx Talks

 

Have you ever had a gut feeling or butterflies in your stomach? Has hunger ever changed your mood? Our bellies and brains are physically and biochemically connected in a number of ways, meaning the state of our intestines can alter the way our brains work and behave, giving a whole new meaning to 'Food for thought'.

In his TEDx Fulbright Santa Monica talk, nutritionist, microbiologist and neuroscientist, Ruairi Robertson is passionate about the link between our bellies and brains. His research is examining how our intestines and the microbes within them can influence both physical and mental health, and most importantly how our diets influence this relationship. Ruairi has travelled the world researching food, and believes it is the key to global public health. Ruairi is a PhD student in University College Cork in Ireland and current Fulbright Scholar (2015/16) to Harvard University.



 
More Information
 
 
 

Recommended Videos

How Does Coffee Compare to Cocaine and Cannabis?

Video

‘I can’t get started without a coffee.’

For many people, this statement is a standard morning greeting. But the mass consumption of coffee can make us forget what caffeine really is- a drug. So how does it compare to other drugs, namely cocaine and cannabis?

WATCH NOW

The Science of Caffeine: The World's Most Popular Drug

Video

Reactions is looking at the science behind the most popular drug: caffeine. Delicious coffee chemistry!

WATCH NOW

The World's First Bioelectronic Medicine

Video

Northwestern University and Washington University School of Medicine researchers have developed the first example of a bioelectronic medicine: an implantable, biodegradable wireless device that speeds nerve regeneration and improves healing of a damaged nerve. Their device delivered pulses of electricity to damaged nerves in rats after a surgical repair process, accelerating the regrowth of nerves and enhancing the recovery of muscle strength and control. The device is the size of a dime and the thickness of a sheet of paper and dissolves in the body after about two weeks.

WATCH NOW

 

Like what you just watched? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Neuroscience

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE