Novel Tools for Cellular Biomechanics

Life In Science

Dr. Wan tells us about his career and the work his lab is doing to advance understanding of cellular biomechanics using microfluidics.

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Lab-on-a-Chip to Help Detect Cancer

Podcast

In this podcast, we speak to Gustavo Stolovitsky to learn about his career and the work he is doing at IBM Research.

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Behind the Science, S2-Ep1: Classic rock & HPLC with Pat McDonald

Video

Every good rock band starts in the basement. So that's where we're heading ... to the basement of Waters to see the first chromatography systems! Pat McDonald, corporate fellow emeritus at Waters, tells us about Jim Waters and Waters Associates' inventions.

The first commercial "high pressure" chromatography system for polymer chemists, the GPC-100, from 1963. The ALC-100, developed in late 1970 for separating isomers in the synthesis of B12. The M6000 pump that came in 1972, followed by the U6K injector, the first commercial "small" particle columns (10 µm!). Bringing those pieces into an assembly led to the first modern "high performance" liquid chromatography instrument, now known as HPLC.

Read up on the history of Jim Waters and his chromatography people: http://bit.ly/2mwT2BI

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 Simple Method for Synthesizing Boronic Acid-Based Drugs

Simple Method for Synthesizing Boronic Acid-Based Drugs

News

Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a broad and strikingly easy method for synthesizing Boronic acid-based drugs.

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Metrion and Venomtech Collaborate
News

Combining Metrion's electrophysiological expertise and screening capability with Venomtech's compound library and venom-based drug discovery expertise will rapidly exploit and develop novel tools for ion channel drug discovery research.

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Drinking Soda Could be Harmful for Your Brain
News

Research from the University of Boston suggests that excess sugar, especially the fructose in sugary drinks, might damage your brain.

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A Promising Model for a Devastating Genetic Deficiency
News

Study describes how a complete knockout of the Ngly1 gene in mice leads to death just before birth, which can be partially rescued by the second knockout of another gene called Engase.

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