Analyze Glycans Up To 5X Faster than HILIC

Video

Obtaining high resolution glycan data has traditionally required patience. Typical analysis methods can take up to a full day. Not any longer. SCIEX Fast Glycan Labeling and Analysis delivers rapid glycan heterogeneity identification, capable of profiling your glycans in record time. Combining simplified sample preparation, rapid separations and automated glycan identification, you can make confident decisions quickly by running glycans up to five-times faster than HILIC.

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Because BIG PCR happens in miniaturized packages

Video

In today's scientific environment, the pressure is on to do more with less. And how do you do that? With miniaturization. Miniaturization is the key for doing more with less in the life science industry. When you miniaturize reactions, you: . minimize sample volume . lower reagent cost . boost throughput Watch a short video of Dr. Luke Linz, LGC Laboratory Operations Manager, explaining how miniaturization works!

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Droplet Microfluidics

Infographic

Learn how microdroplets are generated, and some of the advantages they offer over conventional microfluidics

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Sleep Loss Drastically Affects Your Positive Outlook

Sleep Loss Drastically Affects Your Positive Outlook

News

There are many symptoms of depression -including feeling sad and no longer being able to enjoy things you typically would, but poor sleep is associated with a particularly serious sign of the condition.

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Piglets Might Unlock Keys to IVF in Humans
News

During an attempt to improve how they grow stem cells, researchers discovered a method that uses a special liquid medium and improves the success of IVF in pigs.

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New Way Found to Boost Immunity in Fighting Cancer and Infections
News

Researchers have identified a key new mechanism that regulates the ability of T-cells of the immune system to react against foreign antigens and cancer.

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Using Milk Protein to 3D-Imprint Muscle and Bone Cells
News

Researchers from the University of Canterbury are replicating a 3D imprint of cells onto films made of milk protein. The films then gradually degrade, leaving the grown tissue behind.

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