We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

 

EDITOR'S PICS

Alpha cell in ferret retina
Editor's Pics

Pictured here is an alpha ganglion cell within the retina of a ferret. The cell was labelled with a fluorescent yellow dye.

VIEW NOW

Differentiating neurospheres
Editor's Pics

This image shows differentiating neurospheres. Cells from dissociated neurospheres were cultured and stained for neurons (red), astrocytes (blue) and oligodendrocytes (green).

VIEW NOW

Zebrafish embryo
Editor's Pics

Just 22 hours after fertilization, this zebrafish embryo is already taking shape. By 36 hours, all of the major organs will have started to form. The zebrafish's rapid growth and see-through embryo make it ideal for scientists studying how organs develop.

VIEW NOW

Cerebellar granule neuron
Editor's Pics

A migrating cerebellar granule neuron is seen here in culture.  The cell nucleus is shown in blue, microtubules in red and the actin in green.

VIEW NOW

Neurons in culture
Editor's Pics

A cluster of cerebellar granule neurons is seen here in culture.

VIEW NOW

Neural stem cell culture
Editor's Pics

Astrocytes and oligodendrocytes from neural stem cells are seen here.

VIEW NOW

Developing Nerve Cell
Editor's Pics

Early nerve cell from the ear developing in culture.

VIEW NOW

Neurons in Culture
Editor's Pics

A cluster of a special type of nerve cells called cerebellar granule cells, is shown here growing in culture.

VIEW NOW

Purkinje cells in the cerebellum
Editor's Pics

These specialized cells named Purkinje cells (red) are found in a part of the brain called the cerebellum. They send out vast numbers of branches that make connections with other cells in the cerebellum.

VIEW NOW

Glioblastoma Multiforme
Editor's Pics

Highly invasive human paediatric brain tumour derived cells.

VIEW NOW