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Red Blood Cells and a Spur Cell on the Surface of an Indwelling Vascular Catheter

Credit: Janice Haney Carr/ CDC

Magnified 7766X, this scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image depicts a number of red blood cells (RBCs) found enmeshed in a fibrinous matrix on the luminal surface of an indwelling vascular catheter. In this instance, the indwelling catheter was a tube that was left in place, creating a patent portal directly into a blood vessel. The erythrocyte in the center had undergone the process of crenation, whereupon, it developed a number of cell wall projections, thereby, transforming it into what is termed an acanthocyte, or spur cell.



Red Blood Cells and a Spur Cell on the Surface of an Indwelling Vascular Catheter

Credit: Janice Haney Carr/ CDC
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