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Affymetrix and Baylor College of Medicine Enter into Licensing Agreement
News

Affymetrix and Baylor College of Medicine Enter into Licensing Agreement

Affymetrix and Baylor College of Medicine Enter into Licensing Agreement
News

Affymetrix and Baylor College of Medicine Enter into Licensing Agreement

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Affymetrix Inc. and Baylor College of Medicine has announced that Baylor has obtained a non-exclusive, worldwide license to a number of Affymetrix patents covering comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray services in Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) environments.

Financial details of the license were not disclosed.

"Since the inception of our licensing program, Affymetrix has signed many agreements that validate our position as the clear market innovator and leader," said Alan Sherr, vice president and chief counsel for Licensing at Affymetrix.


"This agreement with Baylor College of Medicine is another example of a mutually beneficial relationship that enables both companies to better serve customers within the growing microarray market."

"Comparative genomic hybridization microarrays represent one of the biggest advancements of the last 30 years in clinical genetic laboratory testing. The technology is being used to identify specific genetic abnormalities in many children that have developmental disabilities with previously unknown causes," said Arthur Beaudet, M.D., professor and chairman of the Department of Molecular and Human Genetics at Baylor College of Medicine.

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