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E.coli Detection Goes Hi-tech

News   Nov 06, 2018 | Original Story by Aditi Risbud Bartl for the University of California Davis.

 
E.coli Detection Goes Hi-tech

New technology developed by Josh Hihath and colleagues at UC Davis, University of Washington and TOBB University of Economics and Technology in Turkey uses atomically fine electrodes to suspend a DNA probe that binds target RNA. The device is able to detect as little as a one-base change in RNA, enough to detect toxic strains of E. coli. Credit: Josh Hihath/UC Davis.

 
 
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