We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience. You can read our Cookie Policy here.

Advertisement
Highly Sensitive Detection Of Malaria Parasites
News

Highly Sensitive Detection Of Malaria Parasites

Highly Sensitive Detection Of Malaria Parasites
News

Highly Sensitive Detection Of Malaria Parasites

Read time:
 

Want a FREE PDF version of This News Story?

Complete the form below and we will email you a PDF version of "Highly Sensitive Detection Of Malaria Parasites"

First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Country*
Company Type*
Job Function*
Would you like to receive further email communication from Technology Networks?

Technology Networks Ltd. needs the contact information you provide to us to contact you about our products and services. You may unsubscribe from these communications at any time. For information on how to unsubscribe, as well as our privacy practices and commitment to protecting your privacy, check out our Privacy Policy

An international team led by Ingrid Felger, from Swiss TPH, Basel, Switzerland, took advantage of genes in the parasite genome that exist in multiple copies to reveal parasites present at concentrations that are 10 times lower than the detection limit of current standard assays.


The researchers compared three methods to detect malaria parasites to look for Plasmodium falciparum in 498 samples randomly selected from a malaria survey in Tanzania: light microscopy, the current standard molecular assay, and the new assays. Parasites were detected in 25% of samples by light microscopy, in 50% by the standard assay, and in 58% by the new assays. Compared to the new assays, the current molecular standard assay failed to identify 16% of infections, and at least 40% of those contained parasite gametocytes, the parasite stage that is transmitted when mosquitoes bite an infected person.


The new assays detect only the most common malaria parasite, P. falciparum, and while they can use very small blood samples collected “in the field”, the analysis itself needs to be done in a biomedical laboratory. Nonetheless, because low-density infections without disease symptoms are expected to become increasingly common as countries improve malaria control, ultra-sensitive tools such as these will likely be critical for malaria surveillance and for monitoring the progress of malaria control and elimination programs.


Original Publication


Hofmann N, Mwingira F, Shekalaghe S, Robinson LJ, Mueller I, Felger I (2015) Ultra-Sensitive Detection of Plasmodium falciparum by Amplification of Multi-Copy Subtelomeric Targets. PLoS Med 12(2) 2014.


 

Advertisement