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Primate Promoters: Sequencing Reveals How Our DNA Regulation Differs From Apes’

News   Jan 30, 2018 | Original Story from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

 
Primate Promoters: Sequencing Reveals How Our DNA Regulation Differs From Apes’

Humans, chimps and monkeys have strikingly similar genomes. This data helps us understand differences across these primate species. It displays information about DNA segments that regulate genes in one small part of the human and chimp genomes, aligned for comparative purposes. There are 3 "lines" of data for each species, with the top line in each (red for human, green for chimp) reflecting the conclusion that in this genomic space, gene enhancer activity in unactivated T-cells is very similar, with one exception: the yellow "peak" (arrows) indicates a likely gene enhancer that's active in human but inactive in chimp. Credit: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

 
 
 

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