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Proteins Writhe Like Snakes As They Wrangle DNA Into Shape

News   Jan 06, 2020 | Original story from Rice University

 
Proteins Writhe Like Snakes As They Wrangle DNA Into Shape

This illustration by Rice University scientists demonstrates that cohesin exists as an ensemble of braided structures (middle). Cohesin is a member of a family of proteins that have an important role in DNA organization, but little is known about the mechanism of DNA operation. Braiding of coiled coil regions was achieved in Rice's computational models using both the initial ring-shaped complex (right) or by applying torque to separated protein members (left). Protein members are shown in blue and red. Credit: Dana Krepel/Rice University.

 
 
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