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Psychedelic Microdosing in Rats Shows Beneficial Effects

News   Mar 05, 2019 | By Becky Oskin for University of California, Davis

 
Psychedelic Microdosing in Rats Shows Beneficial Effects

Crystals of N,N¬-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) imaged with polarizing microscopy. DMT is the active ingredient in the hallucinogenic drug ayahuasca. New studies from UC Davis using a rat model show that 'microdosing' or taking small doses of a psychedelic drug that do not cause hallucinations may have beneficial effects for mental health. Credit: Lindsay Cameron and Lee Dunlap

 
 
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