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Quidel Announces Exclusive Licenses to Molecular Antiviral Resistance and Detection Technology for Influenza
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Quidel Announces Exclusive Licenses to Molecular Antiviral Resistance and Detection Technology for Influenza

Quidel Announces Exclusive Licenses to Molecular Antiviral Resistance and Detection Technology for Influenza
News

Quidel Announces Exclusive Licenses to Molecular Antiviral Resistance and Detection Technology for Influenza

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Quidel Corporation has announced exclusive, worldwide licenses to the antiviral resistance microarray-based influenza detection technology (AVR-Chip) and to the microarray-based influenza B detection technology (BChip), both developed by scientists at the University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder) in close collaboration with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

"We are extremely pleased to enter into these agreements with the University of Colorado, as it strengthens Quidel’s technology foundation in influenza diagnostics," commented Caren Mason, president and CEO.

“Exclusive access to molecular-based technologies for influenza B diagnostics, and for detection of antiviral resistance, greatly complements our ongoing progress with our MChip technology for influenza A, which was licensed in December 2006 from CU-Boulder. These licenses also reinforce our commitment to market leadership in rapid point-of-care influenza diagnostics,” Mason added.

The AVR-Chip is useful in identifying mutations that may confer resistance to antiviral reagents and may then facilitate proper influenza treatment decisions. The ability to identify antiviral susceptibility is important for global monitoring of influenza patterns, and for directing physicians toward better treatment decisions.

The BChip can detect influenza B virus strains, for example B/Victoria/2/87 and B/Yamagata/16/88. This information is critical in determining seasonal influenza vaccines.

In a recent study of 62 influenza B virus samples from 19 countries, dating from 1945 to 2005, as well as five negative control samples, the BChip exhibited 97% sensitivity and 100% specificity, with no false positives.

“After many years of faculty research, we are excited to have executed three licenses with a leading company in the diagnostic industry. This arrangement has the potential to help millions of people,” said David Allen, CU’s associate vice president for technology.

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