Scientists Observe Supermassive Black Hole in Infant Universe

News   Dec 07, 2017 | Original Story by Jennifer Chu for Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

 
Scientists Observe Supermassive Black Hole in Infant Universe

Artist’s conceptions of the most-distant supermassive black hole ever discovered, which is part of a quasar from just 690 million years after the Big Bang. It is surrounded by neutral hydrogen, indicating that it is from the period called the epoch of reionization, when the universe's first light sources turned on. Credit: Robin Dienel (Courtesy of the Carnegie Institution for Science).

 
 
 

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