Sugar Molecule Helps Stomach Cells to Differentiate Between Good and Bad Bugs

News   Sep 13, 2017 | Original story from Max Planck Society

 
Sugar Molecule Helps Stomach Cells to Differentiate Between Good and Bad Bugs

Human gastric epithelial cells with disc-shaped nuclei (blue) infected by Helicobacter pylori (green bacteria). TIFAsomes (red strings) formed upon injection of a small sugar molecule (HBP) by H. pylori into the host cells to cause translocation of the pro-inflammatory NF-kB transcription factor (diffused green) into the nuclei, as visualized in the right-side micrograph channel. Whitish/gray staining represents microtubule network of human cells (left panel). © MPI f. Infection Biology/ L. Pfannkuch

 
 
 

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