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Two German-Based Sister Companies Plans to Develop Workflows for Use of 454 Sequencing Systems in Human Genetics


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The two German-based sister companies, IMGM Laboratories GmbH and the Center for Human Genetics and Laboratory Medicine Dr. Klein and Dr. Rost, have announced their plans to use the GS FLX System and GS Junior System from 454 Life Sciences, a Roche company, for the joint development of robust workflows for targeted resequencing applications in the field of human genetics.

“We believe that 454 Sequencing Systems and the Fluidigm Access Array™ 48.48 System are a perfect match when it comes to amplicon-based targeted resequencing,” said Dr. Ralph Oehlmann, Director Business Development at IMGM.

He continued, “With Access Arrays, target amplification and library preparation can be combined elegantly in one single step. In just under 4 hours, 2,304 nanoliter PCR reactions can be carried out to convert 48 samples into 48 pools consisting of 48 bar-coded amplicons each. In addition to rendering general sequencing services, our main focus will be to offer first class assay development and validation services for the GS FLX and GS Junior platforms”.

Of particular interest to the companies are the advantages of the technology for potential diagnostics applications. “We strongly believe that diagnostic sequencing will rapidly adopt the high throughput technologies used now for genomic research. We have already introduced array technologies for molecular karyotyping some years ago, and will now address the massive parallel analysis of disease associated gene panels using next generation sequencing,” explained Dr. Hanns-Georg Klein, MD, CEO of both IMGM and the Center for Human Genetics and Laboratory Medicine Dr. Klein & Dr. Rost.
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