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Widely “Inconsistent” Use of Antibodies in Lab Experiments

News   May 16, 2019 | Original story from John Hopkins Medicine.

 
Widely “Inconsistent” Use of Antibodies in Lab Experiments

Example of IHC staining. Cells labeled 'Correct Negative' are cancer cells that show correctly that they are negatively stained (brown) because they do not have the gene for the target of the antibody (anti-AKT1). The middle cells show 'Correct Positive' IHC staining because they have the gene encoding AKT1 inserted back into a subset of the cells. The cells on the right were incorrectly stained ('False Positive') using a flawed IHC approach. These cells on the right were stained with the same antibody used in the other two images (left and middle), but with a slightly different procedure. Credit: Ibrahim Kulac, M.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

 
 
 

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