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Cresset Biomolecular Discovery Launches FieldTemplater™


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Cresset BioMolecular Discovery Ltd has announced the launch of FieldTemplater™, its proprietary technology which will identify the 3-dimensional bound conformation of hits and potential drugs in a biological target.

Cresset claims that, this is valuable for targets which lack an x-ray crystallographic structure, such as GPCRs and ion channels.

FieldTemplater™ is based on Cresset's method of modeling compounds in terms of their molecular fields rather than their atom and bond representations which chemists are accustomed to using.

The Field technology has been validated by several major pharma companies for virtual screening over the past year through Cresset's FieldScreen™ software.

FieldTemplater™ is designed to allow users to develop a model of the bound conformation of active molecules by comparing the molecular fields of compounds known to bind to the same biological target.

Cresset's Founder and CSO, Dr Andy Vinter, commented, "Cresset's Field technology redefines the way medicinal and computational chemists look at molecular structures."

"FieldScreen has proved itself as a valuable technology for innovative hit discovery. With the launch of FieldTemplater™ we hope to revolutionise the way we do GPCR and ion channel drug discovery, bringing it into the realm of Structure-Based Drug Design."

Cresset's Field technology defines why two structurally different drug molecules can have the same therapeutic effect.

If these two compounds bind to the same region of a protein, their 'outer skins' must be similar despite their structural differences.

Cresset has developed technology to create accurate fields around a molecule (the 'skin') by questioning and improving the fundamental science behind their generation.

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