Complex Tissue Models that Mimic the Tumour Microenvironment, Heterogeneity and Invasion of Cancer

Video   Jan 03, 2017


The main goal is the development of cell culture model systems to recapitulate key aspects of cancer progression and to functionally validate biomarkers, target genes, and molecular signaling pathways. HCSLab develops complex, organotypic cell-and tissue culture models specifically for phenotypic high content screening, in the areas of both oncology and neuronal diseases. The tumour models aim towards the faithful recapitulation of the complex histology of tumours, including the role of the tumour microenvironment, and monitoring of dynamic cellular processes such as tumour/stroma interactions, tumor cell plasticity, differentiation versus de-differentiation, and tumour cell invasiveness. We recreate living tumour microtissues in vitro for real-time, live cell monitoring of disease processes. The development of complex 3D co-culture models is combined with thorough standardization and miniaturization of the assays, and assisted by automated image analysis software to allow real-time, live cell screening. We will further demonstrate the use of statistical and mathematical algorithms to quantitatively assess the most relevant and significant morphometric changes in tissue architecture upon drug exposure and genetic modifications.


Recommended Videos

CRISPR: Gene Editing and Beyond


The CRISPR-Cas9 system has caused huge advances in our ability to edit genes, but there are many other exciting possibilities for CRISPR applications, reviewed in this video from Nature.


CAR T-Cell Therapy: How Does It Work?


CAR T-cell therapy, like all forms of cancer immunotherapy, seeks to sharpen and strengthen the immune system’s inherent cancer-fighting powers. It involves treating patients with modified versions of their own immune system T cells.


How Does Cancer Immunotherapy Work?


Traditionally, cancer treatment has revolved around chemotherapy, radiation and surgery. But thanks to groundbreaking immune checkpoint blockade research led by Jim Allison, Ph.D., we have a new way to treat cancer: immunotherapy. Rather than treating the cancer directly, immunotherapy trains the immune system to attack cancer.



Comments | 0 ADD COMMENT

Like what you just watched? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Analysis & Separations Cancer Research Cell Science Drug Discovery Genomics Research

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free