Contributions of Mass Spectrometry in the Diagnosis and Management of Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal Axis Disorders

Video   Mar 31, 2015

 

Mass spectrometry can be useful to overcome many of the limitations of immunoassays, which are mainly but not only due to cross-reactivity with structurally related compounds. The talk will discuss how the improvements in the measurement of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids obtainable by well validated mass spectrometry methods are translated into clinical relevant information for the evaluation and management of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis disorders. Among others, mass spectrometry may be useful to avoid clinical uncertainties derived from immunoassay based results and, at the same time, it allows the obtaining of a more complete view of the steroidogenic status of the patients by means of steroid profiling.

 
 
 
 

Recommended Videos

How 2D-LC is Used in Forensic Science at Boston University Medical School - Behind the Science

Video

The focus of a forensic toxicology laboratory is to determine the presence or absence of drugs in biological samples. Often times when it comes to drug testing, the sensitivity of the analytical method is critical because scientists need to detect chemical compounds in very small amounts. Multidimensional liquid chromatography (2DLC) is one option forensics labs can use to test biological samples, such as urine, blood, oral fluid, hair, to determine if an illicit drug or toxin played a role in a person's death.

WATCH NOW

Exploring Multiple Dimensions in the Forensics of “Space Candy” with Boston Uni. - Behind the Science

Video

In forensic toxicology laboratories, the accuracy and precision of an analytical technique are essential in determining what drugs or chemicals may have played a role in an individual's death. Is it possible to use one analytical technique to test a variety of different matrices - liquid or solid?

WATCH NOW

Can Bones Tell Us About Drug Use? How Boston Univ. Tests Solid Samples by 2DLC - Behind the Science

Video

Forensic toxicology chemists face particularly difficult challenges in getting good data from post-mortem specimen when soft tissue and bone have gone through decomposition. Jen visits with Sabra Botch-Jones, an assistant professor at Boston University School of Medicine's Biomedical Forensic Sciences department at their outdoor decompositional facility to learn how they test skeletal remains for drugs.

WATCH NOW

 

Like what you just watched? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Analysis & Separations Diagnostics

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE

We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy