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Design, Validation and Evaluation of a Bioaffinity based Flow-biochemistry Device
Video

Design, Validation and Evaluation of a Bioaffinity based Flow-biochemistry Device

Design, Validation and Evaluation of a Bioaffinity based Flow-biochemistry Device
Video

Design, Validation and Evaluation of a Bioaffinity based Flow-biochemistry Device

About the Speaker
András Guttman holds the Translational Glycomics Professorship at the Horváth Csaba Laboratory of Bioseparation Sciences (University of Debrecen, Hungary) and leads the application efforts at Sciex (Brea, CA) and. His work is focusing on capillary electrophoresis and CE-MS based proteomics and glycomics analysis of biopharmaceutical, biomedical and cell biology interests. Dr Guttman previously held academic appointments at Northeastern University (Boston, MA) and a Marie Curie Chair at University of Innsbruck (Austria) as well as industrial positions at Novartis (La Jolla, CA), Genetic BioSystems (San Diego, CA), and Beckman Instruments (Fullerton, CA), developing high resolution capillary electrophoresis and microfluidics based separation methods. Professor Guttman has more than 269 scientific publications, wrote 35 book chapters, edited 4 textbooks and holds 19 patents. Until recently he served on the CASSS Board and as president of the Hungarian Chapter of the American Chemical Society. He is on the editorial boards of numerous international scientific journals. Dr. Guttman graduated from University of Veszprem, Hungary in chemical engineering, where he also received his doctoral degree. He was recognized by the Analytical Chemistry Award of the Hungarian Chemical Society in 2000, elected as a member of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences in 2004, named as Fulbright Scholar in 2012, received the CASSS CE Pharm Award in 2013, the Arany Janos medal of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the Pro Scientia award of the University and the Dennis Gabor Award of the Novofer Foundation in 2014.
AbstractFlow-biochemistry utilizes continuous flow biochemical devices for biocatalysis, biotransformation and biochemical interaction based flow-analytical systems. Design of flow-biochemistry based rare cell capture systems was supported by computational fluid dynamics modeling. Trajectories of yeast cell movement were followed under a microscope and compared with the modeling results. Melanoma cells were used to evaluate the efficiency of the cell capture capability of the bioaffinity based flow-biochemistry microdevice.
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