We've updated our Privacy Policy to make it clearer how we use your personal data.

We use cookies to provide you with a better experience, read our Cookie Policy

Evolution and Selection of Soybean Nematode Resistance Locus

Video   Feb 16, 2015

 

We have shown that theRhg1 locus is a multi-gene repeat of non-canonical resistance genes in strict tandem formation. Using whole-genome sequencing and PCR assays, we show that different soybean germplasm accessions contain one to 10 copies of a tandemly duplicated unit of 31.2 kb. The individual repeated units were classified into four types by using haplotype phasing techniques, with some Rhg1 loci carrying up to three different types of repeat unit. The Rhg1 locus shows strong signatures of selection and significant linkage disequilibrium in the genome around the boundaries of the repeat within a large population of over 15,000 accessions. The regions surrounding the repeat show indications of non-neutral evolution and high genetic variability in populations from different geographic locations. The linkage disequilibrium around the Rhg1 repeat in accessions carrying different repeat types allows the Rhg1 genotype of germplasm accessions to be inferred using large public SNP array datasets, revealing over 800 new potential sources of resistance.

 
 
 
 

Recommended Videos

Creating the UK's First "Three-Person" Baby

Video

Professor Sir Doug Turnbull from the Wellcome Trust Centre for Mitochondrial Research at the University of Newcastle explains his research into mitochondrial donation, the innovative treatment that hopes to stop faulty mitochondria being passed on from mother to child to prevent incurable genetic diseases.

The first babies conceived with this treatment through IVF may be born in the UK soon.

WATCH NOW

The Secrets of the Koala Genome

Video

From their diet to their diseases, koalas are pretty special. Now researchers have sequenced the koala’s genome, unlocking the secrets that make these fuzzy fellas so unique. The genome is revealing everything from how koalas cope with munching poisonous eucalyptus leaves, to how they respond to chlamydia infections. The hope is that these insights will not only help us understand these fascinating marsupials, but also aid conservation efforts across Australia.

WATCH NOW

John Ioannidis on Moving Toward Truth in Scientific Research

Video

PLOS author John Ioannidis, Professor of Medicine, of Health Research and Policy, and of Statistics at Stanford University, considers how the scientific community can move toward greater truth in published research.

WATCH NOW

 

Like what you just watched? You can find similar content on the communities below.

Genomics Research

To personalize the content you see on Technology Networks homepage, Log In or Subscribe for Free

LOGIN SUBSCRIBE FOR FREE